Sivan Einav

Build FULFILLING ALLIANCES

DO YOU HAVE THE RIGHT ALLIES BY YOUR SIDE?

An alliance is a unique kind of relationship. It brings together like-minded individuals for mutual benefit, without requiring either person to give up their independent status. It allows each person to express their authentic self within the confines of time and space.

An alliance allows us to contribute our gift to humanity and also receive gifts from others. It is a bond that is essential for a balanced ecosystem.
When we work together, we are stronger and the results can be more rewarding.

 

DO YOU HAVE THE RIGHT ALLIES BY YOUR SIDE?

DO YOU HAVE THE RIGHT ALLIES BY YOUR SIDE?

An alliance is a unique kind of relationship. It brings together like-minded individuals for mutual benefit, without requiring either person to give up their independent status. It allows each person to express their authentic self within the confines of time and space.

An alliance allows us to contribute our gift to humanity and also receive gifts from others. It is a bond that is essential for a balanced ecosystem.  When we work together, we are stronger and the results can be more rewarding.
Alliances are about interdependency, rather than codependency. In Kabbalah, this is exemplified by the Tree of Life, or the blueprint of Creation. It contains 10 different vessels that work with one another to create a state of harmony. The principle that governs all the relationships of these vessels is the balance between the two “sides” of the Tree of Life: the right side and the left side.

The right side of the Tree of Life corresponds to chesed—kindness, expansiveness, and giving. The left side corresponds to din—judgement, contraction and withholding. Chesed and din, “right” and “left,” are the Giver (masculine principle) and Receiver (feminine principle) of the Kabbalistic equation. When these two sides are balanced, the center column of the tree, or rachamim—which corresponds to mercy and compassion—is activated.

Alliances are about interdependency, rather than codependency. In Kabbalah, this is exemplified by the Tree of Life, or the blueprint of Creation. It contains 10 different vessels that work with one another to create a state of harmony. The principle that governs all the relationships of these vessels is the balance between the two “sides” of The Tree: the right side and the left side.

The right side corresponds to chesed—kindness, expansiveness, and giving. The left side corresponds to din—judgement, contraction and withholding. Chesed and din, “right” and “left,” are the Giver (masculine principle) and Receiver (feminine principle) of the Kabbalistic equation. When these two sides are balanced, the center column of the tree, or rachamim—which corresponds to mercy and compassion—is activated.
This Kabbalistic equation teaches us about the different combinations of relationships, which are critical to understanding how to build successful alliances:
  • Giver / giver
  • Giver / taker
  • Sharers
  • Taker / taker
Needless to say, the least successful alliance is the one between two takers. There has to be a component of giving in order to achieve balance. A giver and a taker also cannot sustain an alliance long term, as the giver will become depleted.

There is a distinct difference between partnerships and alliances. In a partnership, all members merge resources, and as a result, they share gains and losses.In an alliance, there is collaboration between people that results in an exchange of complementary services. This exchange has clearly defined boundaries, so as to create mutual rewards, and prevents the depletion of each person’s resources. The integrity of each person’s contributions remains intact.

This Kabbalistic equation teaches us about the different combinations of relationships, which are critical to understanding how to build successful alliances:
  • Giver / giver
  • Giver / taker
  • Sharers
  • Taker / taker
Needless to say, the least successful alliance is the one between two takers. There has to be a component of giving in order to achieve balance. A giver and a taker also cannot sustain an alliance long term, as the giver will become depleted.

 There is a distinct difference between partnerships and alliances. In a partnership, all members merge resources, and as a result, they share gains and losses. In an alliance, there is collaboration between  people that results in an exchange of complementary services. This exchange has clearly defined boundaries, so as to create mutual rewards, and prevents the depletion of each person’s resources. The integrity of each person’s contributions remains intact.

In Hebrew, the word brit (Letters: Beit, Reish, Yod, and Tav) translates to “alliance.” When the order of the Hebrew letters are rearranged, we discover the permutation yeter which means “abundance and surplus.” Behind every alliance, there is an opportunity for mutual gain and reward.

In Hebrew, the word brit (Letters: Beit, Reish, Yod, and Tav) translates to “alliance.” When the order of the Hebrew letters are rearranged, we discover the permutation yeter which means “abundance and surplus.” Behind every alliance, there is an opportunity for mutual gain and reward.

Whether you would like to learn how to create a rewarding alliance, or you are struggling with an existing alliance, together, we will work on defining boundaries and building interdependent relationships.

Schedule a
coaching session

Ready to take the next steps?
Schedule your 45-minute coaching session with me today!

Whether you would like to learn how to create a rewarding alliance, or you are struggling with an existing alliance, together, we will work on defining boundaries and building interdependent relationships.

Schedule a
coaching session

Ready to take the next steps?
Schedule your 45-minute coaching session with me today!